torrilla

torrilla:

Life’s ‘Marvel’lous     January 7, 2010

Tom Hiddleston is on the cusp of stardom, having bagged the role of Loki in the Marvel Comics movie Thor

The chatter around British actor Tom Hiddleston has been getting steadily noisier. “One day, that lad is going to be a star, and deservedly so,” declared a theatre critic after watching Hiddleston’s award-winning dual role in Cheek by Jowl’s production of “Cymbeline” (2007).

That “one day” could well be tomorrow, with Hiddleston snagging the coveted role of arch-villain Loki in “Thor”, the Marvel Comics movie of 2010, directed by Kenneth Branagh. While it’s a bad idea to tempt the gods — and especially, the capricious Norse gods — the chatter is now suggestive of a young actor on the cusp of stardom.

“I don’t feel famous,” laughs Hiddleston, in Chennai to attend his sister’s wedding, and taking a break before the “Thor” shoot. Stardom was not what drew him to the profession but accepts that “fame is an essential corollary to actors being able to do the kind of work they want to do”.

What he has learnt from acting alongside stars such as Branagh, Ewan McGregor and Dame Judi Dench is “their continued energy, passion and seriousness about the work — and total lack of seriousness about themselves”.

The same could be said of Hiddleston, in turn, amusing and amused by the myths surrounding an actor. Born in 1981, Hiddleston probably always knew what he wanted to be, but sealed his commitment when he signed on for three years at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA).

This, despite already signing up with the prestigious actors agency, Hamilton Hodell, and having acted in projects such as an ITV production of “Nicholas Nickleby”, a BBC/HBO co-production called “Conspiracy”, starring Branagh, and the Winston Churchill biopic, “The Gathering Storm”, opposite Albert Finney and Vanessa Redgrave. All this, while still at Cambridge, where he read classics and graduated with an enviable double first.

He doesn’t regret RADA, because “it was an immersion experience of rushing from a class in Restoration comedy to one on Irish accents, with some broadsword fighting practice in-between. When I left RADA as a 24-year-old, inevitably, most parts that came my way were roles of young men. But RADA was like Mary Poppins’ carpet-bag, where they kept pulling out unexpected things and throwing them at you. It gave the experience of a career in miniature”.

After graduating from RADA in 2005, Hiddleston was cast in the independent film “Unrelated”, which was critically well-received. But, it was his work on stage that got really noticed. Critics singled him out, even when cast alongside such marquee names as Chiwetel Ejiofor and Ewan McGregor in Michael Grandage’s production of “Othello”. Hiddleston competed against himself in 2008, earning two nominations for the Olivier Award for Best Newcomer (and won for “Cymbeline”). He also got several opportunities to work with Branagh, including the Tom Stoppard adaptation of Chekhov’s “Ivanov”.

“What I love about theatre is that you get to tell the story from beginning to end, every night of the performance.” The endless repetitions do not result in the role becoming mechanical, rather, “you enter a meditative state, and let your subconscious work for you, so that a version that is deeper emerges from you. Like the great musicians, who talk of the music playing them rather than the other way round”.

Hiddleston is currently doing his prep for Loki.Once he actually begins to shoot, he will not refer to this research — “I fill myself up before the performance, and then disgorge it all.”

Conversation turns to what else he has consumed recently, an eclectic mix of Charlie Kaufman’s “Synecdoche in New York”, where he loved the idea that “you are all the people you have ever loved”; Yasujiro Ozu’s seminal 1953 film “Tokyo Story”; and in the same breath, “‘Avatar’, which knocked my socks off. Not since ‘Jurassic Park’ have I been this visually awed by a film”.

Talking movies leads to what drew him to acting in the first place — not the prospect of stardom but the collective experience of being in a theatre, and recognising oneself in what was happening on the stage or screen. As Hiddleston still remembers: “When I left the theatre, the humanity in those stories made me feel less alone.”

PARVATHY NAYAR

torrilla

torrilla:

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.@ELLEUK coverstar @twhiddleston kicks off #celebrityshoeauction by donating his @JimmyChooLtd bit.ly/1pwdsps pic.twitter.com/xCdlGZbS0d

This year, Tom Hiddleston has donated a signed pair of Jimmy Choo trainers that are a size 45. In 2013 Tom donated a pair of signed Converse in size 11. Bid on Tom’s shoes here.

. star has donated his shoes to  

Chris Hemsworth has kindly donated this pair of Under Armour trainers to the auction. The shoes that he has donated are a size 12. Bid on Chris Hemsworth’s shoes here.

tom-fucking-hiddleston

torrilla:

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At look who and I met. Hope you had a great time in , !

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Roberts. Tom Hiddlestone

cazzmatazz:

Cheeky #selfie with Ben from @carolinastory and Tom Hiddlestone. #asyoudo #ama #nashville (x)

carolinastory:

Happy Birthday, Hank Williams first off. Not really sure what to say past that. Great time at the @americanafest awards show tonight followed by some of our favorites at Robert’s Western Worldand meeting some good folks. (x)

meg930: 

Oh yeah, in all the Americana craziness of last week, I forgot to mention I got to have a brief chat with this British tall drink of water. #TomHiddleston (x)

Musistic CEO Jimbo Lattimore with Loki. Yes… Loki of Asgard! Photo courtesy of Ben Roberts from Carolina Story — with Tom Hiddleston andJimbo Lattimore. (x)

Thanks to precursorpress for the instagram photos!

tom-fucking-hiddleston

torrilla:

A fun bunch to share Sept. With - thnx2 to team Hank

Recording soundtrack to upcoming Hank Williams biopic - I Saw the Light - (back l-r) Michael Rinne/bass, Tom Hiddleston/Hank, Chris Scruggs /steel guitar (front l-r) Wes Langlois/guitar, Stuart Duncan/ fiddle, Richard Bennett/guitar — with Wes LangloisMichael RinneTom HiddlestonStuart DuncanChris Scruggs and Richard Bennett at Room & Board, Nashville, Tennessee. (x)

SOURCE: Rodney Crowell Official 

During the month of September 2014, our house in Tennessee became the base camp for Tom Hiddleston’s steady transformation into Hank Williams. I’d been hired by a film company—-whose vision of shining a gritty light on the life and times of Hank Williams piqued my interest no end—-to produce the music and assist their leading man in finding his way into the heart of one of the greatest singer-songwriters of all time. The classically trained British actor arrived in Nashville on the fourth day of the month and the very next day climbed on a tour bus bound for Michigan and the Wheatland Music Festival, his traveling companions Claudia, myself, and a four-piece band consisting of Jerry Roe, Byron House, Pat Buchannan and Steve Fishell. Just minutes before taking part in an afternoon workshop with Sarah Jarosz, whose permission I had sought first, I asked Tom if he’d like to join us onstage and sing “I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry,” a Hank Williams song I’d heard him practicing on the bus. I was surprised when he said yes and skillfully performed the tune before what must have been 1500 people. Later that night, with my band on the main stage, and with very little urging from me, he rendered a joyful version of “Move It On Over.” Afterward, brimming with delight, he admitted, rather boyishly, that he’d never in his life performed with a band and had loved it. On a typical day in September, I watched him sit for a wardrobe fitting, read through four hours worth of key scenes with the director and leading lady, spend another two hours with a dialect coach, and then, in order to lose the weight needed to look Hank Williams gaunt on screen, run seven wicked miles over hilly Tennessee terrain. With those chores done, he’d then commit to six more hours of singing, over and over again, a very hard to master song like ”Lovesick Blues.” And then, when he finally unlocked the mystery of yodeling the blues, hillbilly style, and was treated to a playback of his performance responded by saying “I can do it better, let me go again.” Then came a late dinner, wolfed down before giving in to a few hours sleep. After nearly a month spent collaborating with this gifted artist, I’m as respectful of the man’s work ethic as I’m mystified by his transformational skills. Without a doubt, the filmmakers chose the right actor for the job. And, incidentally, having Ry Cooder as a duet partner on “God I’m Missing You” on the Americana Music Awards Show was pretty damned mystical as well. Rodney

SOURCE: Rodney Crowell Official

During the month of September 2014, our house in Tennessee became the base camp for Tom Hiddleston’s steady transformation into Hank Williams. I’d been hired by a film company—-whose vision of shining a gritty light on the life and times of Hank Williams piqued my interest no end—-to produce the music and assist their leading man in finding his way into the heart of one of the greatest singer-songwriters of all time.
The classically trained British actor arrived in Nashville on the fourth day of the month and the very next day climbed on a tour bus bound for Michigan and the Wheatland Music Festival, his traveling companions Claudia, myself, and a four-piece band consisting of Jerry Roe, Byron House, Pat Buchannan and Steve Fishell. Just minutes before taking part in an afternoon workshop with Sarah Jarosz, whose permission I had sought first, I asked Tom if he’d like to join us onstage and sing “I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry,” a Hank Williams song I’d heard him practicing on the bus. I was surprised when he said yes and skillfully performed the tune before what must have been 1500 people. Later that night, with my band on the main stage, and with very little urging from me, he rendered a joyful version of “Move It On Over.” Afterward, brimming with delight, he admitted, rather boyishly, that he’d never in his life performed with a band and had loved it.
On a typical day in September, I watched him sit for a wardrobe fitting, read through four hours worth of key scenes with the director and leading lady, spend another two hours with a dialect coach, and then, in order to lose the weight needed to look Hank Williams gaunt on screen, run seven wicked miles over hilly Tennessee terrain. With those chores done, he’d then commit to six more hours of singing, over and over again, a very hard to master song like ”Lovesick Blues.” And then, when he finally unlocked the mystery of yodeling the blues, hillbilly style, and was treated to a playback of his performance responded by saying “I can do it better, let me go again.” Then came a late dinner, wolfed down before giving in to a few hours sleep. After nearly a month spent collaborating with this gifted artist, I’m as respectful of the man’s work ethic as I’m mystified by his transformational skills. Without a doubt, the filmmakers chose the right actor for the job.
And, incidentally, having Ry Cooder as a duet partner on “God I’m Missing You” on the Americana Music Awards Show was pretty damned mystical as well. Rodney